Insurance

Al Shore

New Member
Hello all
Is there anyone out there who can help me, I need to insure my motor home which I live in and can't seem to find anyone who is willing to take me on! My circumstances are as follows:
I am 56 and my wife is 57 and we both drive and have held our licenses for years,Our motor home is a Buccaneer cruiser 740 on a Peugeot boxer chassis built in 2003,
We live as wardens on a caravan site for 8or 9 months of the year and the van doesn't move an inch,over the closed period we plan on travelling around this country and also europe for a couple of months so our mileage should be well below 6000 a year,We have sold our house but do have a c/o address,can anyone point me in the right direction please .
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
Al, I am in exactly the same position as you and have been working as Campsite Wardens for three years now. We are insured through 'Comfort' Insurance, however, I understand that things have changed a little with them in that they now will not take on vehicles over 10 years old. But I am sure there are other's who may, Coolasluck has recently taken up full timing in a converted bus, perhaps he will be able to tell you what arrangements he has made :thumb:
 

Al Shore

New Member
Thanks for that BM ,as it happens I was insured with comfort but like you say they won't do it now because of the age of my van , there's got to be someone out there who insures full timers in older vans !!! (Isn't there)
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
you need a relative or a friend to let you rent a room or something .
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
I think that this is one area of fulltiming that creates the biggest frustration. Comfort is, as far as I know, the only people that offer fulltiming insurance. Others advertise 365 cover but when asked specifically about 'fulltime' say that they don't provide 'Fulltime' cover ?????? Now there may be 'other' insurers out there that I am unaware of that do provide cover, I think 'Silver Drifter' suggested that he had found someone so it may be worth doing a 'search' on here and finding out who that was, or indeed, send him a Private Message and ask him. Others may elect to take the risk and not declare that they are fulltiming, but this is certainly a personal choice that is potentially fraught with risk and being economically deeply unsound. You pay Insurance premiums but then get caught out if you make a claim, meaning your vehicle repairs, or total loss, is not covered and the money you have been paying, for whatever number of years, may as well have just been put down the drain. But !! It is a 'personal' choice/risk.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
there could be no choice .
i decided years ago it was causing so much aggro for people . there was no-one then . unless you were a proper traveller . or showman.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
As you always used to state Alan, everyone has choices. Those choices may be difficult and mean having to adapt or be flexible. However, I do agree that for 'some', dependant on personal circumstances, some choices are not achievable. For example, Al could get fulltime insurance if he had a vehicle that was under ten years of age, but that may involve making other unplanned or unscheduled choices like changing his vehicle, but that has a cost implication which may then impact on how he had intended to fulltime. But, if Silver Drifter has found a legitimate and less costly alternative to 'Comfort' then there may be a solution. I think you have to take blinkers off and look at other 'solutions', and what is personally viable. Another example of this, an ordinary Comfort policy (and potentially other Insurers) allow up to 8 months European Cover in any one year, so you could keep a property and so not be totally 'fulltiming' in your Unit, you have a registered UK residential address and you remain on the 'Electoral Role'. If as a result of Brexit we are restricted to European travel, basically 180 days in any one year ( but no more than 90 days in any one 180 day period)' then you can only do six months 'European' travel anyway so a matter of just sorting out a travel itinerary and hey presto a solution. If you cannot maintain a permanent UK residence then you have to look at alternative solutions but it depends on what and how adaptable you are prepared to be, but there are solutions, if you are prepared to be flexible in your thinking and willingness to adapt your initial 'dream plan' :thumb: I am talking from a bit of personal experience, due to the recent Referendum outcome we are now having to adapt our original 'long term' plans but until the dust settles and Article 50 is triggered and we start to see the outcomes we have to consider a 'number' of potential options, choices, we have a number ready but making no firm or hasty decisions just yet ;)
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
at the moment i get 365 days full european and some others with my policy.
yes its one of the reasons i keep property .
if i really needed to leave this house then i can and still have half share in my parents old house.
waiting to see how the eu thing works out .
never know years ago you got entry to each individual country . portugal and spain werent in the eu .austria ,switz ,greece ,turkey .as a kid we visited them all . maybe not every year but on entry and exit it was passports ,customs etc . i can remember it like it was yesterday was good fun . as kids messing them around .
i,m sure the eu is going to breakup. so it might be like the old days .
mind it might be we visit morocco. possibly algeria will open its borders again to us . then tunisia is on the route to catch a ferry to france or italy.
i,m sure part of algeria and its borders is because of the eu. and its old relations with france .
but back on track renting a room for a penny a week with family or a friend could work.
 
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chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
has anyone ever asked the insurance industry the question? I would love an answer
I can get 3rd party cover for a uk reg vehicle for anywhere except the uk. this is by a dutch company, it just don't seem right.
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
eric, I doubt you have to think about it for a good few years yet.
I might even move to spain myself.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
The good old days eh !! Yes, I remember them as well but I don't think it will actually ever get back to them. EU may break up, but not to the degree of the 'old days', not any time soon anyway, in my personal opinion. But then again, the EU restrictions may not happen at all, it will depend I think on who becomes the next PM and the deals that are struck, but we will let that one play out as we, the public, have no say on that one. Then there is the Scottish issue, and it is an issue, from an English perspective that is. My opinion is that they will not settle until they are Independant so, let them have another Referendum and await the outcome, I am not certain that the majority will vote the way that Nicola Sturgeon wants it to go, but I could of course be wrong and if I am then we will have to wait and see how that pans out. One thing I do know is that nothing is certain at this moment in time about Europe and Scotland, it's a case of just carry on with each day and await the outcome then get on and deal with it :thumb:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
no probs here . i really dont see any problems . just may have to do things abit differently .
cant say the good old days just days gone by.
certainly wasnt so many touring around back then .
mind some used to be on campsites in spain all summer . or all winter .
big continental frame tents ruled back then . uk ridge tents certainly took the wind and rain far better though . i remember the frame tents blown up and away . i still have my dads old ridge tent with enormous fly sheet so we could sit outside even if it was raining . onle we were in switzerland and were almost last tents standing . there was 13 of us then in a mini bus . we had two tents as well. great fun .
mind mebyon kernow might get cornwall independance as well. so that might make travel easier . falmouth could run boats out to north africa etc .
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
eric, I doubt you have to think about it for a good few years yet.
I might even move to spain myself.
Chris, we do need to think about it, as it stands at the moment, but I have always been a 'planner' so try to have contingencies and options available. Taking up permanent residency in Spain is one of those options but 'Brexit' may alter some of the financial implications as the reciprocal arrangements we currently enjoy will/may change. However, I have never actually seriously considered 'permanent residency' as something I wanted to do. Sharon and I have had very many discussions since the Referendum result on how the impact may affect us and we are still quite positive. Strange how some decisions you make have advantages that you didn't consider when you made them :wasntme: Working for the Caravan Club has now given us flexible options for the future, options we hadn't had to consider before, we are fortunate, more by good luck than any pre-conceived judgement, but we are in a pretty good place at the moment and have directions we can go in depending on what the outcomes are of recent events. I am not trying to be smug for I could not have foreseen three years ago, when we took the decision to sell up and live in a Motorhome, what was going to unfold, either in the purchase of the Apartment in Spain or with the Caravan Club jobs but I do always try to be positive and not worry about things that I have no power to influence or change. :thumb:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
an insurance policy taken out in the eu as to cover the minimum requirement in all eu countries for 365 days or the length of the policy so that dutch one as to cover uk.
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
I get what you mean , I think they are a few years off with any decisions on who, what and when things will happen. as you might know I have a son and a daughter living in spain with their families, I have not asked them anything yet, though one works in gib and gets paid in pounds. the exchange rate might make a little difference and they find the Spanish system easy once you find a good bilingual lawyer.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
just leave it to the royal marines they have already practiced invading spain .
should spain close the border with gib the marines are very good at invading . ha ha . i saw it only a few years ago. bilingual is no good you might need to speak catalan as well. ha ha . mind never know the moors might retake andalucia again after all it was theirs .
it really does open up all sorts of things , could make a film about it . hee hee .
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
an insurance policy taken out in the eu as to cover the minimum requirement in all eu countries for 365 days or the length of the policy so that dutch one as to cover uk.
sorry to inform you it doesn't, because the firm is not based in the uk the eu law prevents them insuring a vehicle in the country it is registered in if the insurance firm is based in another country,
if it is registered in the uk and the insurance company is based in the uk then all of the eu is covered.
I have written to them and had the reply only can't find it to put on here.
they will however insure my vehicle in Australia for 12 months from the time it leaves the uk but not in the uk.
I did originally try for the eu as they do not require a post code address. at this present time Aus is out...
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
just leave it to the royal marines they have already practiced invading spain .
should spain close the border with gib the marines are very good at invading . ha ha . i saw it only a few years ago. bilingual is no good you might need to speak catalan as well. ha ha . mind never know the moors might retake andalucia again after all it was theirs .
it really does open up all sorts of things , could make a film about it . hee hee .
last time they had to go via north africa:giggle:
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
We like Spain, obviously for the good all round climate, but we also find the Spanish people exceptionally and genuinely friendly, the way of life is much more relaxed than in UK and so, if you have the financial means required to live permantly in the country, primarily taxation and health, then a full time residence in Spain has a lot of advantages. Many people talk about the value of property, but as I said when I had a house here in UK, the re-sale value is only important if you want to sell it. I will always disagree with Alan when he claims that UK is cheaper than Spain or Portugal. Now into our second year of owning a property in Spain and paying the associated annual bills, I can say that it is cheaper to own our property in Spain than it was owning a property in UK, and that includes taking the Mortgage aspects out of the equation, which we had to pay in UK. Our food bill for three months in Spain was cheaper than it was when we were in UK and! Although some of the menu choices are slightly different, living in that sort of climate, we still eat fish, meat, vegetables, fruit and bread. You have to change your thinking though from being a tourist, it is different being out there on holiday, including three month Winter Sun extended stays, to living out there permanently. Sharon would move out there permanently tomorrow, if we were in a financial position to do so, however, I still have a 'Wanderlust', an itch that I still need to scratch ;)
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
insurance ombudsman-----08000234567 might try them Monday, see what they say.
or 02079641400 , should get there.
There are three main types of caravan - and the type of caravan often affects the type of insurance available. The three main types are:

  • static caravans/mobile homes
    caravans that are pitched at specific locations, such as campsites or caravan parks, often on a long-term or permanent basis;
  • touring caravans
    caravans that are towed by motor vehicles and can be transported frequently and to many destinations;
  • motorised caravans/motorhomes
    these are vehicles in their own right and are often built using a truck or van chassis. Subject to acceptance criteria, these caravans may also be covered by standard motor insurance.
Caravans vary enormously - but generally have common features such as living space, and amenities such as cooking and sanitary facilities.

from their website but all as clear as mud------------------
 
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