U.K use 12 months is Winterisaed essential

hertsmas

Active Member
As per the title. Im struggling to find my long term moho and have my eye on a couple of cheaper ones that i might like to 'try out' motorhoming in. I love Hymers but 80 percent of them dont have the layout I want/need. More lounge area please Moho designers !

The trouble is the Moho's i'm seing ( non German) arent 'Winterised' . I'm thinking non winterised even in the U.K in February for example would be a silly idea. Am I being over cautious. I cant nip off for the winter to spain yet as I'm still working for at least two years . Sorry yet another question but I hope its a sensible one.

Cheers

Mas
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
We nearly got a MH, and checked out loads at the shows. The Laika people were very keen to tell us about how robust their MHs were for winter, but as always - check specs!

They said Scandinavia was their biggest market - odd, given they are Italian.

In my opinion, for cold damp places, I'd avoid anything with wood or plywood construction. Synthetic materials rot less and you get fewer fungal spores.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
most german ones arent winterized . its a myth that they are.
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
that is a hard one----------we are new to Eurovans and feel that the best winterised one you can get will pay dividends even in Spain/Portugal winter----less condensation/lower heating costs-------if you hit some real cold weather there is a good chance of everything working.----------IMHO-----you are better going for a good oldun than a flashy newer one. ------or consider self-build??

I also think that the rigid foam build is less likely to end in rot------------BUT moisture damage is always a potential problen
 
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hertsmas

Active Member
I know many folk live 365 in old Hymers and although some folk here arent fans they do have a reputation of being well winterised. The chances of me getting a British or Italian Moho for under 20,000 second hand that is 'winterised seem remarkably slim aka non existent.

" In my opinion, for cold damp places, I'd avoid anything with wood or plywood construction. Synthetic materials rot less and you get fewer fungal spores. "

, totally understand your above comment and agree whole heartedly but that rules out just about every older van I've seen :)
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
Different people have different ideas on what 'winterised' is------to the Yanks it is an RV that is 'prepared' for winter eg. all the water is drained down and water 'U bends' filled with (RV) anti-freeze.

I don't really know-----but our's has worked incredibly well in cold British winter weather
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
I also think that the rigid foam build is less likely to end in rot------------BUT moisture damage is always a potential problen
Again, you have to be careful - I checked this out a lot, and for example, the vast majority of US kit that uses "rigid foam" or "vacuum-formed panels" (which they are proud to talk about) actually still have ply facings as part of the sandwich - I imagine there must be Euro MHs that are the same. Unless you know it's 100% synthetic or you built it yourself to a decent spec (inc. plywood or Argus bottles :) ) you do have to watch out.

It is one of my hobby horses, but many MHs/Caravans/5W's are going to die young, a scandal - just like when all cars used to be too rusty to get an MOT after a few years.
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
, totally understand your above comment and agree whole heartedly but that rules out just about every older van I've seen :)
I am of the belief that the recent explosion of MH sales made the market very competitive and cost-savings were found - which is to say older MHs may well be more sturdily made, wood or not. If you dig around there do seem to brands that are more known for rotting.
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
Different people have different ideas on what 'winterised' is------to the Yanks it is an RV that is 'prepared' for winter eg. all the water is drained down and water 'U bends' filled with (RV) anti-freeze.
Yes, they are talking van storage in this case. What you need are lagged pipes, heated or internal tanks and double-"glazed" windows for living in the winter. Don't use pure butane.

I'm sure vwalan has a better list of things to look for, but then again he is either in Cornwall or Spain/Morocco, so probably never sees a frost!
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
many german m,homes are wooden framed .
yes many of the sandwich foam panels do have thin plywood in the contsruction . you only have to spend a bit of time trawling the net to hear of delamination problems . trucks suffer badly with it .
i prefer ally skinned with ally framework.
when out and about have a look at the campers you will see delamination much more once you start looking .
plus alot of the fibre glass ones have a problem . cant remember the technical name but its a problem with fibre glass , even some boats have had it .
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
I had a Swift Kontiki before my current van, even though the fresh water tank was internal it still had an air duct from the blown air heating to it, don't let people tell you that you cannot overwinter in UK in a UK built van.
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
TE="BigMomma,847, member: 74"]But what is the definition ofzed ! A genuine question not an argumentative one :thumb:[/QUOTE]
Thats a hard one to answer.....
i guess i would think that everything internally would still work at -10c
 

John and Joan

Well-Known Member
We have used our A class integral Hymer S700 1992 in very cold conditions. We were on the site that BM is on at Spittal near Berwick one New Year and all the water on site was frozen up in the morning and the drains would not take anything other than a trickle of grey water. The warden closed the site after asking all the vans to leave.

Inside the van with the two gas heaters going 1 x 2.8kw blown air only (E4000) and 1 x 2.8kw blown air and convector (S3002) we were very comfortable and EHU kept the power going. This was in blizzards and they closed the A1 just after we got through. We left our waste drain tap open into a bucket which was a block of ice and the waste water area looked like a sand castle contest. Our inside tank was fine with the heating running past it. The coldest point was the cab, as it is (by law) single glazed and even with Silverscreens it was the coolest area of the van. Our heating system also has outlets from the blown air up the walls behind the seat backs and around the bed area. That is how Hymer winterised the older vans. The bodies are 32mm foam insulated in the roof. 25mm in the walls which was the same as UK vans of the 1980s. Batteries need to be insulated at these temperatures or they will be very inefficient as they are rated at 25c, not zero or below.

I have lived in a Fairholme Goldfinch (British CI caravan) with 25mm insulation all round during the winter of 1982 at minus 20c with only a Carver SB1800 (1,8kw) supplemented by two gas lights. I also had some heat from the fridge and 1kw occasionally from a heater, off a generator shared with another van. Ice on the inside of the windows due to condensation for weeks. (I was warden on a caravan storage site)
You can exist in these conditions but as far as we are concerned, you need to be on a site from now until Easter if you intend to stay in the UK. That is why we head for Spain usually about October to April/May.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
i would agree if in uk in winter then ehu is a reality and a necessity.
i have lived through winters in uk built vans and caravans . but without mains leccy would have been dreadfull.
i like the aldi blown air heating or the aldi wet radiator system that many m,homes use.
but i must admit a good woodburner or coal stove is the answer. coal or coke isnt cheap but does give a nice dry air.
now a catalytic heater and gas lights work fine . have been in -17c up in the mountains and been nice and cozy.
also can be in the desert in over 40c and be cool . lack of roof lights help. but the small windows high up either keep the heat in or let it out in hot climates .
self build is the way . but its still not cheap.
 

Dunroamin

Well-Known Member
I think Steve has got it about right except I would say -10 celsius and standing wild ,no EHU. We have walls 14mm T&G ,Goretex ,40mm styrofoam ,4mm marine ply.Roof 12mm T&G 40mm styrofoam and steel that you can walk on. We heat with wood or brickets ,we dont have double glazing but the window glass is 12mm Panzerglass.We have never had a problem with condensation and have stood often enoug by -20 celsius.In the ski season there are enough German mohos standing without EHU . That said the older ones seem to be better built and still fetch a decent price when 20 years old. The majority in the hands of pensioners who in Germany are a pretty canny lot.
 

Dunroamin

Well-Known Member
I think Steve has got it about right except I would say -10 celsius and standing wild ,no EHU. We have walls 14mm T&G ,Goretex ,40mm styrofoam ,4mm marine ply.Roof 12mm T&G 40mm styrofoam and steel that you can walk on. We heat with wood or brickets ,we dont have double glazing but the window glass is 12mm Panzerglass.We have never had a problem with condensation and have stood often enoug by -20 celsius.In the ski season there are enough German mohos standing without EHU . That said the older ones seem to be better built and still fetch a decent price when 20 years old. The majority in the hands of pensioners who in Germany are a pretty canny lot.
 

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