Fylde, Lancashire

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
I bought All the Aires and the ACSI Camping card earlier this year,other than that I use all my old guides that I have used for years.I have downloaded quite a few camper guides and will buy the Bord Atlas for next year.I subscribe to Motorhomefacts and they have a good database that I used last year to find a Stellplatz on my home from Munich with Orville the Truck (my Frankia).:)
Looks like you are well sorted ;):thumb:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
the cepsa is the best map of spain and portugal names all the little coves and beaches that others dont .shows nice little white roads where you find the best places .shows green lines at the side of the road in nice areas.
mind if you need your hand held it doesnt do that. get out there try and not use campsites or aires have an adventure.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
the cepsa is the best map of spain and portugal names all the little coves and beaches that others dont .shows nice little white roads where you find the best places .shows green lines at the side of the road in nice areas.
mind if you need your hand held it doesnt do that. get out there try and not use campsites or aires have an adventure.
Getting out there IS the adventure isn't it, doesn't matter whether it's wilding, Aires or campsites. And never needed my hand holding yet, but havn't been stupid enough not to make use of information and knowledge already out there. What do you think a map is ;) someone took the time and trouble to provide the locations of the coves and beaches, the little white roads and green lines :rolleyes:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
i used to use a map from 1974 . that was a good one . still got it havent had my moneys worth yet.
but i,m sure you really dont need all the guides . better to spend the money on diesel and get out there.
i knew a guide once . she was a girl guide .learnt a thing or two about camping . memories .
innocent ones . we moved house back down here . story of my life always just missed out.
 

bigtree

Active Member
I got the Cepsa Mapamax last week,pretty good detail shows all the beaches,fuel stations and places of interest.It's A3 size but only 1 :400,000 whereas Michelin France is 1:200,000 you can see every bend in the road.We wilded at a spot we had visited a few years ago and vowed to stay there when we got a van,so this year we did even though a few people had said you wouldn't be able to as they had banned it.Got lucky nobody bothered us but a week later another couple told us they had a knock at the door at midnight,just north of Porto Covo,Portugal.Truly stunning but that whole coast is like that,another wildy we did was at Foz do Arelho though it was more like an Aire without facilities.And when we go that way again we are going to stay at the rocky peninsula at Peniche,best thing to do is Google map it don't know how I found places before this wonder weapon.:thumb: Now that I have told everyone a few good ones let's see a few back.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
but i,m sure you really dont need all the guides . better to spend the money on diesel and get out there.
How many times have you said about people who go out there not thinking it through and then have to return with their tale between their legs. So I know when I am going to do it and won't be rushed by anyone into doing it before I am ready to do it for as long as I choose and in the manner I choose :thumb: I do need the guides so that I know where to find the services and facilities that I may just need when I am out there. When I have got some miles under my tyres then the guide books won't be needed as much as like you, and lots of others, who have done the miles and got the knowledge of places to go it's all about experience. We all have to start somewhere
 

bigtree

Active Member
We have the best maps in the world thanks to the Scots,if we hadn't kept coming down and kicking your a**e we would never have had Ordnance Survey maps or good old General Wades roads.I personally love maps especially old ones,really like following all the Roman roads here and abroad.:D
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
but you arent selling up and being daft. its just an extension of your life.
i sometimes think the ones that have a guide book trip are the ones that get it wrong . by the time its written and published its out of date and its all changed .
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
I havn't used the Michelin maps a lot but lots swear by them for continental driving. I have lots of the OS Maps for UK, they are better than the road atlas for giving more detailed localised information. Modern technology is good and everything has it's place, but still need to rely on gut instinct as well occasionally and perhaps the odd guidebook as well ;)
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
i have loads of old maps . have one of plymouth just after the war .proposed route for bypass . took 40 odd years and after all the meetings etc etc its on the same proposed route . they built all the houses etc so there was no where else for it to go.
have been collecting them since a child . got several from the 40,s and 50,s .
ordenance survey ,expensive when new 4shilling and six pence.in 59
3 and 6 in 1947.
 

bigtree

Active Member
The way the French build roads and change from RN to N to D you need a new map every year.they have changed the RN85 to the D4085 (route Napoleon) :confused:
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
but you arent selling up and being daft. its just an extension of your life.
i sometimes think the ones that have a guide book trip are the ones that get it wrong . by the time its written and published its out of date and its all changed .
We may end up having to sell this house though and downsizing :( Initially we will do long trips, probably 11 months for the first 3-4 years and then it will be more like 8 monthers. Just because you have guide books doesn't mean that you go on a guide book trip as you call it. The idea is to head off and then when you need somewhere for services you can look at the books to see what is available to you in the area you are in, bit like looking at a map to find a nice cove or beach to park up. As said earlier, the more experienced you become the less you may need those reference books but anyone going out for the first time, and not intending staying on campsites, would be stupid not to take some kind of guide a bit like going out without a map, or a spare wheel, or a tool kit.....you may not have to use them but worth taking along just in case you do ;)
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
use a compass you have an idea where you want to be going . thats how i work through the big cities .
 

coolasluck

Well-Known Member
Right...im taking notes here..........spare wheel,tool kit...anything else b.m?:D
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
two spares cheaper here than abroad. and batteries are cheaper here.
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
Hi
We use guide books to learn about WHAT is worth seeing in an area that we are travelling to-------remember that you read it in a book ---along with a million others:cry:---------------------------------for example, we were in the North of Portugal last winter and read about a massive market------something we go out of our way for,so we got to it the night before to camp/park and had a great day:thumb::thumb::thumb:but, as expected, was very busy:cry: ----------------------Things like that are only one day a month, so the guide book helps to plan the route to make the correct day:thumb:
New maps are essential to know which roads are now toll----makes route planning easier:)---------------------we seek out the smallest roads when we are in the area/Country that we want to spend some time,and again, we can plan a circuit if we know where the roads go now.
We use sat-nav mostly to locate co-ords,----takes a lot of stress out of locating known positions----also to establish the co-ords of places we find that we want to record for future use.
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
two spares cheaper here than abroad. and batteries are cheaper here.


We don't have the space/weight capacity to carry two spares:cry:---------and last week we bought a battery drop tester to try to eliminate battery problems--------we were sooo lucky this year as the truck batteries dropped dead soon after we arrived back in UK:eek:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
i always carry a drop tester . you never know when one goes down otherwise . brings the rest down if you dont realise.
tyres are quite expensive in morocco. thats why i take spares . two for truck .two for trailer and very often a spare carcase for each. have been known to use them all. specialy when running through the sand . the thorns growing under the surface cause havock . guess you know what i mean really. chewing gum stick repairs to the rescue very often.
 

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