Decision made!

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
#21
Several years ago I asked the question of a fulltimer, "What do you do to stop the boredom ?", I was told that fulltimers never get bored, they just have loose moments :giggle: There is no magic answer other than 'flexibility', adapt to the 'different' lifestyle :thumb: There will still be things to be done, shopping, laundry, cleaning the van (inside and out), combine those 'domestic' chores with the time spent 'travelling', moving from different locations, exploring new places you choose to stop at and enjoy some relaxation, sitting and watching what is going on around you can be time consuming and tiring so allow time for some 'personal contemplation' (best done with one's eyes closed ;)). Do you have any hobbies you can do whilst on the road e.g. Reading, Photography, Fishing, Cycling, Walking, Swimming, Painting, Drawing or even Writing (A blog telling others about your adventures) etc. etc. etc. You will be in total control of your own pace of life, somedays may be hectic so then you allow a restful day or perhaps two. Just enjoy it, learning to slow down is much harder than you may think, now you have time to do things you never had the time to get around to, try a new hobby interest, learn a new language, the world is your oyster as they say :thumb:
 
#22
We're getting a bit of a taste of what it'd be like to be a full-time or long-termer at the moment. Normally I'd batter my way down through England to get to France and it wouldn't be unusual for me to be driving 500+ miles in a day. This time we've taken our time and taken several days to get to London and it is a lot more relaxing and has meant that we can stop for sightseeing stuff on the way. Today we drove from near Lincoln to Epping, which is only 128 miles. That mean we could have a leisurely start to the day, a visit to a National Trust property (Woolsthorpe Manor, where Isaac Newton was born) and still arrive at the CS we're using tonight in the early afternoon. As the CS is in the grounds of a pub then by 3pm or so I already had a nice cold pint in my hand!
 

Silver Drifter

Well-Known Member
#23
Three or four years ago, I was chatting to a young Dutch chap and he maintained he only ever drove for an hour or so each day......I couldn't see the point until quite by chance I did the same coming up through France......suddenly I was converted to it! I then met a Brit ex-pat couple who said they 'drove the French canals'....they explained they stopped every 30 or 40km along the canals and then cycled up and down, so that they actually covered the whole canal!!
You wont get bored.......
 
#24
That's what we're planning, just a short drive each day or couple of days, stay a bit longer where we like it and move on quickly where we don't. We won't be in any rush to get anywhere so it'll be about enjoying the ride rather than any particular destination.

Nice ideas there BigMomma, was planning maybe a blog and diary, and always do lots of reading, but I'd forgotten about photography - always wanted to do more of that and we got some great pictures of the Northern Lights from Skye when we went there a couple of years ago so that'll definitely be on the schedule. Realy looking forward to it now!:thumb::thumb:
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
#25
sometimes you only drive from one end of a village to the other.
then locals from where you were ask why you moved . come back its ok we like you.
with in a few minutes sometimes locals will drop off carrier bags of oranges or beans or something from their allotments . its amazing .
i,m sure there are places i could just stop all winter abroad and never move .
mind others we do move ever day , one night here then one night there . even the local police say thats ok . just dont stay in one place for two nights and its ok. depends what place we are at.
some places we actually stop in the police station parking area . been doing it or years , they ask what happened last winter should we not have a few nights in their carpark that year.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
#27
well getting a bag of oranges doesnt happen.
but i do know lots of places that get regular visitors year after year. certainly cornwall as lots of places . but not in the main tourist areas.
every country as its places where the majority go but not far away will be quiet local places where visitors are made welcome and not just for their cash.
dorset used to have them when i lived up there , when my lads were young we used to go back to places i knew as a kid and it wasnt a problem.
wales in the right places is still great. again a bit inland but not far from the coast.
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
#28
It would be good for you to browse --- www.mobile.de---- look for motorhomes there are thousands of different types/layouts, I am not suggesting you buy there (but many in UK do) just see a larger range of vans.
Ours is a n+b flair on a 6 ton iveco chassis ---- we love it but it took a long time to find!!!!
 
#30
Well, a month later and I think we have a decision - probably..... Well we cant find anything that really suits us, and in reality we want something 'a little different', so we are probably going to do a self build. Such a lot to think about about and research, from what base vehicle to use, to what layout, and even what type of finish we want.

After a few weeks we've (I've) decided it really ought to be a Sprinter LWB, though a crafter has certainly been in the running too. A minibus seems a good place to start, plenty of windows, often rooflights too, sometimes even a diesel heater fitted, but they dont have much in the way of insulation so would need all the headlining etc pulled out and redone. A welfare van, crewcab, and a few others are also options so now at least we know where we are headed and can focus on getting the perfect vehicle.

I think it might be a long hard slog, but we do have just a couple of leads to follow up so watch this space!
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
#31
hi. you may find that after awhile in a mini bus type vehicle the big windows arent quite as good as you first thought. .
lets folk nose at what your doing and spot things to nick.
at night very thick curtains required or you light up like a chinese lantern.
plus a brick soon gets entry if your in a out of the way place. large windows allow big things to be passed out.
i used a coach in the early 80,s and it soon became a bit of a wish to change it. ended up paneling most of the windows over on the outside . with ally and painting it.
prison transport etc come with nice quality insulation and roof hatches etc plus steps ,side door etc .
nice square walls etc . using a van makes conversions harder to do.
but anyway have a good time converting and lets hope you find a good one.
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
#32
Loads in Australia have vehicles with large windows and ask "why don't european stuff have large windows" I sort of think it's security but not sure.though some in Aus say "Don't you want to look out"
Talking to a guy the other day who has downsized twice in as many years .he now has a 6mtr Hobby.
He has gone "South" for over 40 years but now his wife has an illness that's not covered by ehic and can't get health insurance . Can't name him as not sure he wants people to know about his missus ... but he agrees with vwalan on moving around and people helping..
Only been moved on by police twice in 40 years .
He had a 9mtr home but found parking it a problem in the UK. Hence the downside..
I would say to think of where you want to stay and the size of vehicle you get.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
#33
My daughter and her partner have recently returned from Australia and they have just bought a SWB Sprinter van, ex-works van so no windows in rear. He is doing a self build conversion including putting windows in side panels and half windows in top of rear panel doors. He has just started the work, he has no garage and can only do work on it at weekends when he is not at work, the dark and colder nights are restricting how much he can do in the week but he is anticipating having it completed by early Spring next year. Just before we left for Spain he had ripped out the old floor and boarding on the side panels, re-wired, insulated the floor and refitted a new floor board. They will only be using their van for short holidays, 1-2 weeks at a time initially, so not planning on long term living in it.
 
#34
I can see the downsides of a minibus, glass is heavy and they are usually 5t vehicles, but as with everything there are upsides and downsides. Ex prison vehicles usually have very high mileages and are usually wider than vans so not what we are looking for. Whatever we buy, I'll be installing several security features, not the all singing, all dancing electronic stuff, more simple stuff that will take time to get round and hopefully make thieves give up and go to an easier target - not any of yours I hope!

We do need some space so are looking at LWB Sprinters, I don't think we could manage in a MWB, and although they are pretty large vehicles they should still be able to negotiate most situations whereas a 7.5t truck may struggle.

We have pretty well decided layout but I'm not looking forward to the dreaded DVLA alterations, it should be a simple process but DVLA do seem to make a hash of simple issues in my experience. Still, we'll be detailing the whole build with photos etc so hopefully that will satisfy them without too much of a struggle.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
#35
i helped purple bob convert a citroen van this summer . just sent pictures of the finished camper table set etc bed made etc details of every thing and posted on a sunday .
the log book was sent back as a motorhome and received two weeks later.
dvla etc are a doddle if you just do a good job of telling them what you have done.
mind as to be done nicely and to the right specs.
sorry dont have pics . but watchout the purple people eater camper could be in your area .
actually he is in spain at the moment . in the valley of the wolves .
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
#36
're the conversion
If it still looks like a commercial van or has "Bob the Builder" on the side you will have no chance with the dvla.
It has to look like a motorhome and adhere to their specks. They will tell you what they want.
I started to look into it but got told "there's wood involved" and you are crap with wood so we will buy one.
I'm still hoping one day she will have a change of heart...
 

coolasluck

Well-Known Member
#37
Can't beat a self build. I have never been in plastic fantastic that ever fealt like home or was fit for purpose.Cold and plastic will never do it for me. Ugly and common mostly. Their only appeal is that you can sell them on easily. The only other option is to buy an older piece of Tupperware with the correct chassis and drive parameters,then gut it and rebuild for your own use.Only an option if you are not aiming to sell on.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
#38
're the conversion
If it still looks like a commercial van or has "Bob the Builder" on the side you will have no chance with the dvla.
It has to look like a motorhome and adhere to their specks. They will tell you what they want.
I started to look into it but got told "there's wood involved" and you are crap with wood so we will buy one.
I'm still hoping one day she will have a change of heart...
it has abig factory type stuck on window in the door ,then a shallow sietz slider behind the door two very small sietz hinged windows on the drivers side .
same size as mine 300x500mm. no windows in the back doors .
cab is separate to the rear , bulkhead across behind drivers seat but small look through in middle .
it was white but now its another colour with a silver roof.
does have a new fort william and the ben ,,picture print on the rear doors.
bet you cant guess what colour it is ,hee hee.
 

chrisjones18

Well-Known Member
#39
Can't beat a self build. I have never been in plastic fantastic that ever fealt like home or was fit for purpose.Cold and plastic will never do it for me. Ugly and common mostly. Their only appeal is that you can sell them on easily. The only other option is to buy an older piece of Tupperware with the correct chassis and drive parameters,then gut it and rebuild for your own use.Only an option if you are not aiming to sell on.
Got to agree as most manufactures even if they use them don't do it for any length of time.
Our fiberglass and aluminium thing (no plastic here) has everything in it we need and its fully insulated. Bloody bed ladder is no good for me though as I struggle when getting up and walking first thing.... Sally just laughs !!!!
We have been looking at others but I can't justify the extra price so I'm just going to lower the bed as it's huge under it.
 

coolasluck

Well-Known Member
#40
Got to agree as most manufactures even if they use them don't do it for any length of time.
Our fiberglass and aluminium thing (no plastic here) has everything in it we need and its fully insulated. Bloody bed ladder is no good for me though as I struggle when getting up and walking first thing.... Sally just laughs !!!!
We have been looking at others but I can't justify the extra price so I'm just going to lower the bed as it's huge under it.


Hi Chris hope your having fun. I know what you mean about them ladders!! When we had our hymer my wife fell down them one morning. Didn't like the idea of them drop down beds at the front. If you need to get away In a hurry then it's not happening, any kind of ladders are an accident waiting to happen,just ask your head
My problem is grazing my head on some strips of LEDs in the bathroom for the mirror lol. Did it again just an hour ago.
 
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