Council Tax and Full Timers

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
Alan, I respect your stance on honestyand I mean that with sincerity. Because of my profession I have to be squeaky clean in both my professional and personal life, I cannot even afford to get a speeding offence otherwise I am in very hot water. However, whilst I am in agreement with what you say about obeying the rules and being honest, the reality of the situation these days is that honesty is not always the best policy. It always appears to be that the honest ones get shafted for everything whilst those that are less honest or should we say 'economical with the facts' manage to play the system. Is this right or wrong, depends on your viewpoint I suppose.

If we take Insurance companies by way of example, Motor Insurance, Life Insurance, Medical Insurance, Travel Insurance etc, doesn't matter they all work on 'Risk' and 'Probabilities'. They are not in business to look after us, they are in business to make a profit and so they assess the probability of an incident or event happening and choose whether they do or do not take on the risk. We as Individuals live our lives the same way, Criminals view getting caught as an occupational hazard and view that the risk of getting caught is worth it, people who claim benefit when they perhaps shouldn't, veiw it as a risk worth taking, people who cross busy roads not at pedestrian crossings take the risk of being run over, people who drive faster than the speed limit do so because they view that the risk of being caught is low, people who use mobile phones whilst driving consider that it is a worthwhile risk etc. etc. etc. As with everything, you as the individual assess the risk of something and then elect whether or not you do or do not take the risk. If you get it wrong then you accept the consequences and for some it is worth taking that risk.

I am sympathetic of some, not the career criminals or those who have no morals and will openly abuse the system. However, the beaurocracy of the system is in many ways flawed and it is the normal everyday memebr of the public who gets the raw end of the deal. If I were in a different situation would I be 'economical with the facts' in certain circumstances, to be completely honest I probably would.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
i try to study the rules .then make my decisions based on them .sometimes you can do as you want with out even straddling that fine line. i just havent found a good one for not paying road tax or having insurance. i have said before my truck allows me to live the life i want .no car to tow can leave trailer etc . dont have to come back for mot . as it is i still come back. i removed the seat belts as i dont use them .not needed in my year truck. you get the idea. abide the law as best you can then kick its ARSE WHEN YOU CAN AS WELL. i do try to be law abiding .
remember if you get caught doing something and say i didnt know. you leave yourself open to a punishment. if you can interpret a way that allows what you are doing you stand a chance. but lie and you get two punishments in one.
 

BigMomma

Well-Known Member
The bit about the electoral roll is something we had not considered so will proberly have the SIL as our contact address:cautious:
I think problem solved if you utilise that solution. How many times you visit your MIL is up to you, I would say that you are a very caring and attentive individual in providing care and supervision for your ageing family member wouldn't you agree :rolleyes:;)
 

Matrix Man

New Member
I live in Spain being an Ex Pat, but have been offered a job for 11 months in the UK starting February. My question is if I'm living in my motorhome whilst working ( and paying my taxes ) do I pay council tax. I would be using a camp site in Norfolk and depending how long I can stay there may switch between 2 or three sites all within reach of work. I'm happy to pay CT if required. Thank you your help.
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
You only pay council tax if you occupy or own a property, as far as I know. If you rent out your house, the tenant pays the tax.
If you are on a site, some of the fees you are paying will go towards local taxes, just as if you were in say, a hotel.
If you use an address, whoever is known by the council to be the householder may have to pay additional council tax based on the number of "occupants".
 

square_steve

Active Member
In my opinion it is wrong for anyone, including fulltimers to avoid council tax. Everyone generates waste, uses roads and footpaths, libraries, and relies on the first class job police carry out along with all the other services funded by council tax.
Just because it's the public purse doesn't make it alright to take without putting in.
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
There's a big differencee between avoiding and simply not being liable...

On a campsite, some of the fees you pay are collected by the site owner and paid to the local council.
I, for one, live on sites except when travelling between, so I contribute. I have also just paid a fair income tax bill like many on this site will have done. People who live as freeloaders probably don't pay anything, but this doesn't mean they are liable for tax, and I don't recall the last time I saw someone put their hand in their pocket to pay for tax they didn't owe, as a moral stance.

The biggest scam ever pulled by our leaders is to make believe that unpaid tax is mostly down to us "little people", but which ignores the elephant in the room, i.e. the corporations and wealthy individuals that coninue to avoid paying fair taxes.

Always lots of talk about this, but funny how there's not much action, isn't it? World-wide, there is at least $13 trillion of money hidden from tax authorities (none is mine). Our chancellor lives well of the off-shore trust fund set up by his dad's business, and meanwhile only 1% of the UK population holds over 50% of the wealth of the nation. I know people will keep voting for this to continue because presumably "trickle down" works well for them, but let us keep a perspective on the serious tax avoiders - it isn't really people in MH's...
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
There's a big differencee between avoiding and simply not being liable...

On a campsite, some of the fees you pay are collected by the site owner and paid to the local council.
I, for one, live on sites except when travelling between, so I contribute. I have also just paid a fair income tax bill like many on this site will have done. People who live as freeloaders probably don't pay anything, but this doesn't mean they are liable for tax, and I don't recall the last time I saw someone put their hand in their pocket to pay for tax they didn't owe, as a moral stance.

The biggest scam ever pulled by our leaders is to make believe that unpaid tax is mostly down to us "little people", but which ignores the elephant in the room, i.e. the corporations and wealthy individuals that coninue to avoid paying fair taxes.

Always lots of talk about this, but funny how there's not much action, isn't it? World-wide, there is at least $13 trillion of money hidden from tax authorities (none is mine). Our chancellor lives well of the off-shore trust fund set up by his dad's business, and meanwhile only 1% of the UK population holds over 50% of the wealth of the nation. I know people will keep voting for this to continue because presumably "trickle down" works well for them, but let us keep a perspective on the serious tax avoiders - it isn't really people in MH's...
 

square_steve

Active Member
I referred to the use of local services, what happens elsewhere in the world doesn't make it right for us to avoid shouldering our share of the cost.
87% of statistics are inaccurate of the remaining 13%, 11% are invented to add gravitas to an opinion so why base a point upon them.
 
Last edited:

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
87% of statistics are inaccurate of the remaining 13%, 11% are invented to add gravitas to an opinion so why base a point upon them.
I quote the former chief economist at consultancy McKinsey (have you heard of 'em?) and the ONS (heard of them either?); not just opinion then...
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
Guy's I have NO intention of avoiding any tax I only ask because I will be living in the MH when not at work. I will be paying NI etc, so just making sure I have the facts.
The thing is, a MH is not a home:
https://www.gov.uk/council-tax/who-has-to-pay
But maybe governments make it all up, just like with statistics data? :)

If you are on a site, the site pays your council tax. This applies to gypsies too, who, if on a traveller's site indirectly pay council tax.
It's about land ownership and property occupancy - if you live wild, you do not pay council tax, although you do contribute tax through things like VAT, NI, Income Tax etc.. and in any case there is no mechanism to collect tax from those who are not in a property.
Having said all this, if you are working and paying tax, you will need to have an address for practical purposes and whoever lives at that address will have to pay council tax.
 

Matrix Man

New Member
Thank you all for the help now just go to find a nice place new North Walsham that will allow long stay. Life is just one big adventure.
 

sundowners

Well-Known Member
I do believe that if you stay in one place for more than 28 days ?? you are liable for council tax------Scotjimland could tell you more than me---he has first hand experience of it I believe--------if you don't want the hassle, just move around every month or so
 

Steve Freeman

Well-Known Member
I do believe that if you stay in one place for more than 28 days ?? you are liable for council tax------Scotjimland could tell you more than me---he has first hand experience of it I

I recall that too. I have asked at different sites about maximum length of stay and it varies by location and by 'reason'. I believe (but have never been given a credible story when I asked people on site) that you can fall into being "residential", and thus liable for tax, but I also was told at one site that the management just claim 28 days to be a bye-law, so they can turf off people who they don't like without having a confrontation.

I guess that anyone who owns a site will know what the position is with bye-laws, council tax etc., at least for their own locality.
 

vwalan

Well-Known Member
no, if on longer than 28days campsite owner should tell the council then you get charged .
mind if you do have a property and fold up remove some furniture you can get 6 months grace on council tax .
 

Matrix Man

New Member
no, if on longer than 28days campsite owner should tell the council then you get charged .
mind if you do have a property and fold up remove some furniture you can get 6 months grace on council tax .
We should be moving ( going to the odd rally and show ) each month so I would guess 25 days max, but by the looks of it to the same place ( I have found 2 nice sites in North Walsham ).
 

Adverts

Top